Category Archives: Yoga Practices

Bhadrasana – The Gracious Pose

Bhadrasana or the Gracious Pose is good for activating the Mooladhara chakra. In Sanskrit ‘Bhadra’ means ‘auspicious’ and ‘asana’ means ‘pose’. Bhadrasana is mentioned in the Hatha Yoga text Hatha Yoga Pradeepika and also in the Gheranda Samhita.

Vrishchikasana – The Scorpion Pose

Vrishchikasana or the Scorpion Pose is an inverted pose and an advanced yoga asana which has great benefits for the nerves, the endocrine glands and has anti-aging benefits. In Sanskrit, Vrishchika means a Scorpion. In the final position, Vrischikasana resembles the scorpion with its tail lifted upwards. When a scorpion wants to sting its victim, it raises the tail above the back and strikes the victim over the head. This pose resembles a scorpion ready to strike. This pose is usually done at the end of asana practice.

Veerasana – The Hero’s Pose

Veerasana or the Hero’s Pose comes from the Sanskrit words ‘Veera’ which means a Hero or a Warrior and ‘Asana’ which means a Pose. Veerasana is called the Hero’s or a Warrior’s pose and can be used an alternate pose for meditation and contemplation. Veerasana is a relatively easy posture, but those suffering from knee and ankle pain should avoid it.

Siddhasana – The Accomplished Pose

Siddhasana or the accomplished pose is an asana used for meditation and other yogic practices. In Sanskrit ‘Siddha’ means ‘accomplished’ or an ‘adept’ and ‘asana’ means a ‘pose’. Siddhasana is mentioned in the Hatha Yoga text Hatha Yoga Pradeepika as one of the four most powerful sitting poses suited for meditation.

Kurmasana – The Tortoise Pose

Kurmasana or the Tortoise Pose is so called because the asana looks like a tortoise in the final pose. In Sanskrit, Kurma means tortoise. When we observe a tortoise, we see that only the hands and legs protrude out from the shell. In the final position, this asana imitates the tortoise. Kurmasana tones the entire abdominal muscles, removes belly fat and is good for diabetes.

Naukasana – The Boat Pose

Naukasana or the Boat Pose stretches the abdominal muscles and tones all organs in the abdomen. In Sanskrit, Nauka means a boat and Asana means pose. In Naukasana the body takes the shape of a boat in the final position, hence the name Naukasana. Naukasana is good for those who wish to reduce belly fat and for developing the Abs muscles.

Brahmacharyasana – The Celibate’s Pose

 

Brahmacharyasana or the Celibate’s Pose helps to conserve sexual energy and strengthens abdominal muscles. It comes from the Sanskrit word Brahmacharya which means control over the senses especially the sexual urge.

Garbhasana – The Foetus Pose

Garbhasana or the Foetus Pose resembles a foetus in the womb in the final position. Garbhasana brings one back to the original state of mind when we were in the mother’s womb.

Yoga Mudrasana – The Psychic Union Pose

Yoga Mudrasana tones the spine, lower back and the abdomen. Yoga Mudrasana or the Psychic Union Pose is generally classified as an asana, even though the name suggests that it is a mudra. Yoga Mudrasana may be a little difficult for beginners, but when practiced can give great flexibility to the back and the hips.

Garudasana – The Eagle Pose

Garudasana or the Eagle’s Pose is an asana for enhancing body balance. The word Garuda means an eagle and refers to the mythical king of birds called Garuda, who is also the vehicle for Lord Vishnu. Garudasana is done in the standing pose, balancing on a single leg with the other leg wrapped around it.